How to Eat Acorns: Video Part 2

In the video blog above, I talk about how to turn acorns into food by removing the bitter astringent compounds in the nuts. Specifically, I cover hot and cold leaching. There are other ways of doing it than just the ones I cover above, including using lye, lime, clay, or sand. For in-depth info on those methods, I recommend Sam Thayer’s book, “Nature’s Garden.”

In plants, tannins serve as antimicrobial agents. For this reason, people can use the water left over from leaching to make an astringent, antiseptic skin wash. Tannins are also used in hide tanning.

Here are other great resources on eating acorns:

Hank Shaw on “Acorns and the Forager’s Dilemma”

Hank Shaw on “Acorn Pasta”

FinnPo on Korean Acorn Jelly, 35 Acorn Recipes, and more

Green Deane goes “Nuts for Acorns”

Share this post and teach your friends how to make free, healthy, gluten-free flour in an urban apartment.

8 thoughts on “How to Eat Acorns: Video Part 2

  1. Reblogged this on Puijos Living LOVE and commented:
    Rebecca LErne is she a wildfood enthusiast, a herbelist a wild girl or just a little elf flying through the forest and lands in portland… she is a wonderful being… and this serious is on preparing acorns for food especially here leaching it with cold process from tanisn by putting it in a water stream river like environment <3 have a wonderful life becky

  2. Reblogged this on Rewilding TK and commented:
    Rebecca LErne is she a wildfood enthusiast, a herbelist a wild girl or just a little elf flying through the forest and lands in portland… she is a wonderful being… and this serious is on preparing acorns for food especially here leaching it with cold process from tanisn by putting it in a water stream river like environment <3 have a wonderful life becky

  3. Hey, thanks for covering this, fun. And you got a response from Steve Brill, which is also cool :). I also was glad to see the links — I didn’t know that Hank Shaw had written about it, great. I learned how to leach acorns from Sam Thayer’s book Nature’s Garden, which is a favorite. Cheers!

  4. Hi Becky,

    I have additional info in my app, Wild Edibles, that you won’t find elsewhere: If you live somewhere with serious winters, gather overwintered acorns just after the last of the ice and snow has almost all melted, in late winter or very early spring. Enough tannin is leached out of red oak acorns by natural processes that they’re equivalent to freshly-gathered white oak acorns, so they require much less additional processing.

    You don’t have to hang acorns from a branch to leach them in a stream. You can put them in a sack weighted down with rocks, as long as you remember the location.

    The toilet tank method you describe may turn your toilet black, but if anyone complains, you can just tell them that you forgot to flush!

Leave a Reply